This Detachable Plane Cabin Could Be The Future Of Airplane Safety

Fear of flying is one of the most common phobias, despite the overwhelming evidence that your chances of dying in an airplane crash are infinitesimally small.

While air travel is an extremely safe form of transportation, innovations to make it even safer are always welcome. Which is why the idea of a detachable cabin, designed by former aviation engineer and crash investigator Vladimir Tatarenko, is so intriguing.

Detach With The Push of a Button

Tatarenko proposes a new airplane design in which the cabin is a separately contained section of the plane, with the ability to detach from the cockpit and wings at the push of a button.

The roof of the detachable cabin contains two parachutes that can carry the cabin to the ground safely after it has detached from the rest of the plane. Inflatable cushions are built into the bottom of the cabin to allow for a (theoretically) soft, survivable landing on water or land.

Lufthansa Presents Its First Airbus A350-900
Getty Images | Alexander Hassenstein

Streamline Boarding

Interestingly enough, Tatarenko says his design would not only improve plane safety, it would also streamline the arduous boarding process as well. The detachable cabin would allow travelers to board in a separate area, then be delivered to the tarmac and connected to the cockpit and wing section.

This could speed up the boarding process and cut down on congestion in airport terminals as large groups all board in the same area.

Silhouette of young family and airplane
Adobe

Will The Design Come To Life?

It’s a fascinating and ingenious concept, to be sure, but as CNN Travel points out, Tatarenko’s vision wouldn’t have an easy transition from a dream to reality.

It would be incredibly costly to manufacture and test the new design, and there are some major issues with the concept itself, such as how the cabin would safely land in a mountainous or urban area (and also, what about the pilots’ safety?).

Still, it’s a creative new way to think about the innovative safety features we might see in planes of the future.

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Getty Images | Joe Raedle

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Thanks to Tatarenko, we have a new concept to daydream about, and a potential (if slightly far-fetched) blueprint for what planes might look like a few decades from now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvArUn0EKsY

One company released an updated airplane seat design last year that gained some attention. A Colorado-based company called Molon Labe Seating created an ingenious “side-slip” airplane seat design that would improve the boarding process. It would also make flying a bit more comfortable, thanks to the addition of a slightly wider middle seat.

Adobe

As shown in the video below, in a typical three-seat arrangement, the side-slip design would allow the aisle seat to slide toward the window seat to create a wider aisle. I’m guessing this would mean everyone with window seats would board first.

In order to make room for the aisle seat to slide over, the middle seat is slightly recessed behind the aisle and window seats. And — bonus !— the middle seat is designed to be two inches wider than traditional airplane seating.

Molon Labe Seating

Do you think the airplane industry needs to do more to update airplane design and improve flight safety?

Additional reporting by Genevieve Lill. 

New Seat Design Could Make Airplane Boarding So Much Easier

The days of epically long boarding times and bumping our way down narrow airplane aisles to find our seats may be behind us.

A Colorado-based company called Molon Labe Seating has created an ingenious “side-slip” airplane seat design that would not only improve the boarding process, it would also make flying a bit more comfortable thanks to the addition of a slightly wider middle seat.

As shown in the video, in a typical three-seat arrangement, the side-slip design would allow the aisle seat to slide toward the window seat to create a wider aisle. I’m guessing this would mean everyone with window seats would board first. In order to make room for the aisle seat to slide over, the middle seat is slightly recessed behind the aisle and window seats. And—bonus!—the middle seat is designed to be two inches wider than traditional airplane seating.

While there are not immediate plans to bring this design into reality, I certainly hope that changes soon. Not only would a faster boarding time save airlines money (it costs airlines about $100 for each wasted minute on a runway), this new design could transform the much-disdained middle seat into the most desirable one on the plane.

 

A Couple Got Married Mid-Flight So Her Mom With Stage 4 Cancer Could Attend

Recently, passengers on an Alaskan Airlines received a special surprise: a mid-flight wedding.

Flight attendant, Kristy Stratton, and Jim Larsen wed in February on a flight from Los Angeles to Seattle. What’s special about this flight, is they met six years earlier on a layover to the same destination.

The bride told TODAY, “I was thinking of unique wedding ideas while driving home from a red-eye about a month before the wedding and thought it’d be a cool idea to get married on that exact flight.”

The most touching part? They pulled it off so Kristy’s mom, Billie Jo, could experience her daughter marry the man of her dreams. In September 2014, Billie Jo was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. On her bucket list? To see her daughter’s life in action: where she works, where she lives, and of course, to see her marry Jim.

Cue the tissues.

[h/t: TODAY]

Airline Crew Delays Flight So Passengers Can See This Spectacular Phenomenon

Earlier this week, Alaska Airlines delayed a flight by 25 minutes so their passengers could get an epic, once-in-a-lifetime view of a solar eclipse.

According to the Alaskan Airlines blog, “The March 8 rendezvous over the Pacific Ocean was not luck, but a precisely planned equation. The calculations began a year ago. The only variable was the plane.” The problem? The flight was scheduled to pass through that exact spot 25 minutes too early.”

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blog.alaskaair.com

That’s when Astronomer Joe Rao took action. He convinced the airline to delay the flight so the passengers could experience the eclipse first hand. He even offered informational packets and safety glasses to the other travelers so they could fully enjoy the experience reported ABC News.

 

Wow! Watch 2 Men Fly Jetpacks Next To An A380 Plane

As a kid, I loved watching the movie, The Rocketeer. Set in 1938, a stunt pilot finds a jetpack and flies around saving the country.

Now, that dream is even closer to becoming a reality. Yves Rossy (also fondly known as “Jetman“) and his protege, Vince Reffet, stun us in their latest feat: flying in formation alongside an Emirates A380, the world’s largest passenger aircraft.

Meticulously choreographed, the pair and an A380 plane fly above the Dubai skyline to produce amazing video footage of this heart racing stunt.

At only 88 pounds, the jetpacks can zip along at speeds of up to 170 knots (about 195 miles per hour). Want to watch more? Check out their YouTube channel and website.

[h/t: Mashable]